Getting the Right Pose

  When I first started doing fashion and artistic photoshoots, I struggled with posing the models. If the model was experienced, I didn’t have any issues because he/she already knew how to use her body to create certain looks. Personally, I have a difficult time posing in front of the camera, so it would also make sense that I would have a hard time explaining what I wanted from the model. This was especially true in the case when I worked with people who were uncomfortable being in front of the camera.   In a boudoir photography workshop I participated in a few years ago, the teacher showed us a notebook that was filled with different types of poses. The notebook was divided into categories, such as sitting, standing, and closeup poses. I thought this was a brilliant idea, so I created my own notebook. The next time I had a shoot, instead of describing the pose, I had the model look at some examples. It worked like magic. Since then I have always brought examples to my shoots.   My goal with poses is to find something that looks “natural” for the model. We’ve all seen those awkward photos […]

Themes

I enjoy all my shoots, but I particularly had fun with this one. When I first mentioned doing a photo series for the 7 Deadly Sins, a lot of people told they thought it was over done. In some ways they’re right, but I thought it would be an interesting challenge to see if I could come up with my own interpretation, despite the fact so many people have put their own stamp on this theme. This photoshoot was Gluttony, which involves an excess of food usually. I got the inspiration for this shoot from an old Gwen Stefani video called “Luxurious.” There’s a scene where Stefani is lying on colorfully wrapped candy. I loved the colors and the concept, and so I adapted it to my shoot. I certainly did get weird looks at the store when I picked up bags and bags of candy. Though I bought quite a lot, it still wasn’t enough. During the shoot, I made sure to arrange the candy so that I would be able to go back into Photoshop and clone the candy so that the entire background would be covered. The editing was a little more difficult than I thought it […]

Happy Hour at Parkwood Studios

I’ve always struggled coming up with exciting or unique poses, and  the fact that I put so much pressure on myself to suggest cool poses on the spot doesn’t help either. During the last Happy Hour shoot, I saw that the model had absolutely no problem coming up with different poses and expressions, and I decided that I should let her choose the pose and then I’ll compose the shot. Since my background is concert photography I’m more used to photographing things that are outside of my control. Unless there’s a specific look or idea that I have, I like to collaborate with the other person. In this case especially, our model, Lux Lacheln, had a lot of great ideas for poses that complemented the wardrobe and background. I think the results turned out pretty well.

Happy Hour at Parkwood Photography Studios

   I love going to the workshops hosted by Photographers Adventure Club. These shots are from the most recent Happy Hour Shoot at Parkwood Studios. I’ve never been confident setting up lights in the studio because it requires a high level of accuracy. Lighting, according to many photographers, is the most important element to good photography. So you can imagine why I’ve found it a bit stressful. I really appreciate how PAC sets up the lights and backdrop. Even though I’m not a part of the process, I still learn a lot from watching. The models PAC brings to these workshops are also really good. Since most of my work is the realm of photojournalism, I’m not used to coming up with poses on the spot. Every model I’ve photographed through these workshops has been amazing at coming up with poses. I imagine it’s tough trying to come up with different ideas, but they never cease to amaze me. I’ve actually learned the most from models when it comes to poses because they already know what works and doesn’t work for them.

Body of Art

  I’m naturally a really shy person, but I’m also very curious. Photography has afforded me opportunities to learn about people, various cultures, and different perspectives. As I come to the end of my book, I’m revisiting some of the earlier shoots, when I didn’t know for sure how this project would evolve. I’m so grateful and honored to have met some incredible people through this portrait series. It’s easy to think that we’re all so different that we feel we can’t connect. If anything, this project taught me that no matter how different our lives may be, there’s is always a place to connect with people. We just have to take the time and listen. The black and white photo is from the very first shoot for my book. Angela taught me a lot about what it’s like being a tattooed woman in today’s world. I have been lucky to have worked with Angela on many shoots, and I’m very honored to have her in my book.

Building My Portfolio

I’ve reached a point in my photography where I actually need a physical portfolio. Most portfolios, I have read, include anywhere between 12 to 24 images. Even though I have shot countless photos, I found the process of selecting images to be quite painful, and that’s not because I’m in love with all of my photos. Unfortunately, I’m one of those people who can pick myself apart to the point of tears. I’m extremely self critical. A little self-critiquing is good, but I happen to be a zealot. In the end I had a couple people I trust give me their suggestions as to which images they think I should include. Sometimes when I’m too close to a project I ask others for their opinion. Oftentimes, they see things I haven’t picked up on because I’m too distracted with the technical aspects of the photo. Building my portfolio taught me that I need to appreciate the journey just as much as the final result.

Photo”shopping”

I’m one of those people who enjoys playing in Photoshop almost as much as I like photography. Most of the time, I use Photoshop to correct colors or correct “flaws” that don’t add to the image. However, there are times when I use the software to create a particular look. Let me be clear, I’m not done with this image, but I wanted to demonstrate how I sometimes like to utilize Photoshop. This time I used the Snow White Action, which I purchased from Amanda Diaz’s site. I love Diaz’s work, and, if you haven’t seen her work, I highly suggest you check her out. Since the shoot mainly revolved around Angela’s red dress and this kind of vampy look, I used the action to accentuate the red and give Angela a porcelain complexion.